About Us

Why “Storied Firearms”?

One of the first questions asked by folks is “why the name Storied Firearms?”.

So…I tell them a story about how after spending some time with my wife’s grandfather recently, we came to the realization that if we didn’t document his stories that they would eventually be lost forever. This got me thinking about all those folks that have wonderfully interesting stories attached to a firearm…yet have no one to leave the firearm to once they pass on…and their story is lost.

This was the beginning of Storied Firearms. Not only were we going to carry Antique, Collectable and Modern firearms, but we were going to carry firearms that have a documented family history…storied firearms.

All of us have a story…

At Storied Firearms we seek out the story…have you ever walked into an antique store and wondered about certain pieces on display? I’m always curious about who owned it, how did they acquire it, how long did they enjoy it, and how did it end up here? We have all types of firearms, but we are so intrigued with the ones that have a history. That interest really sparked after spending quite a bit of time with my wife’s 85 yr. old grandfather. Talk about a story! He lived through the depression as well as served in WWII. Can you imagine the changes he has witnessed??!! We came to the realization that if we didn’t document his stories they would eventually be lost forever.

One afternoon we were talking with him and we found a colored pencil drawing of a fishing port that was clearly done some time ago. The detail in the drawing was amazing and it was obvious to us that he put a great deal of time into the piece. Yet, rather than being displayed proudly, it was stuffed between some meaningless magazine articles. He was a Merchant Marine and while on the ship in the Pacific he began drawing what he saw. The sailors were not allowed to have cameras and he wanted to capture the scenery.  There were several drawings and we have properly framed them so that our family’s history will be preserved for future generations.

We got to thinking about all those folks that have wonderfully interesting stories attached to a firearm…yet have no one to leave it to once they pass on…and their story is lost.  We’d like to capture that story and preserve it. Not only were we going to carry antique, collectable and modern firearms, but we were going to carry firearms that have a documented family history…storied firearms. Do you know someone that has a Storied Firearm?

Charlie Harris is a nationally recognized competitor in the shooting sport of Cowboy Action Shooting. He has held numerous State and Regional titles as well as finishing in the top 10% in National and World Championship competitions. He and his wife Cherie started Storied Firearms because of their passion for shooting and preserving history.

From Thrillist.com

Storied Firearms

Storied Firearms

Once upon a gun…

9300 U.S. Hwy 290 West, Bldg 2; West Austin; 512.394.0125

Every gun has a story, some of them enthralling, some that will just put you to sleep. Hit a gun shop where all the metal spins good yarns: Storied Firearms.

Storied’s a guns & ammo destination whose totally unpretentious/ un-aggro owner (a jet-ski racer turned state-ranked sharpshooter) plans to fully catalog the back-story of the shop’s functional antique & collectible firearms using guncyclopedias, a semi-auto-trained eye, and a historian’s ear for detail (sit still, Stephen E. Ambrose, this will only hurt for a minute). Since he’s just starting out, the details on individual guns range from anecdotes and factoids to full-fledged narratives, the latter best-repped by a Colt 1911 Red River Arsenal Rebuild with a refurbished 1918 military frame sold in 1960 to a father who passed it on to his son without ever firing it, so you know he was a good kid. Still awaiting a full hashing-out are a 1958 Winchester Model 62A rifle often referred to as a “gallery gun” for its use at state fairs, derringers including a four-shot Sharp Pepperbox (built 1859-74), and Civil War-ness like a Model 2 single-action Smith & Wesson likely carried by an officer based on its low serial number, as new weapons tended to start out with higher-ups before trickling down to the people who’d actually be shot by them.

For those more interested in today’s firepower, their cases are also stocked with modern Glocks and semi-auto EBRs, lovingly referred to by the owner as “Evil Black Rifles”, new models whose stories have yet to be written, but’ll most definitely end with a bang.